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Thursday, September 20, 2012

The Fruits of our Labor - 2012 (Harvests #5)


"There is nothing more exciting and happy moment than when you see your plants growing and bearing fruits after lots of hard work everyday in our country living."


BUTTERCUP WINTER SQUASH PLANT (wild)


BUTTERCUP WINTER SQUASH HARVESTS (wild)


BUTTERCUP WINTER SQUASH FIELD (garden)


BUTTERCUP WINTER SQUASH HARVESTS (garden)

  
SWEET MEAT WINTER SQUASH PLANT (garden)


SWEET MEAT WINTER SQUASH HARVESTS (Garden)
Remember, we got only 3 winter squash from the wild plants that grew in the midst of dried limbs I gathered?  It's really a blessing because we didn't really plant anything in that area. Now, we got lots of buttercup and sweet meat winter squash from the real garden. We were able to harvest sweet meat (16) and buttercup (32) excluding those that were eaten up by bugs and got rotten. Not bad for just 2 spaces allotted for each type of winter squash, isn’t? When the rind of the buttercup turns dark green and hard, then they   are ready for harvest.  When the rind of the sweet meat turns creamy gray and hard, then they are also ready for harvest. The tendrils around the base of stem of both kinds of squash should look withered.  Leave a 1 inch of the stem intact when you cut them off the vine.  This winter squash is also a member of the Cucurbitaceae food family I mentioned before.  *It provides antioxidant support and anti-inflammatory benefits.  It also has potential blood sugar regulation benefits and prevention of type 2 diabetes. 


Please see Mom's Oven for recipes:


BUTTERCUP WINTER SQUASH (before baking)


SWEET MEAT WINTER SQUASH (before baking)
The Great Gardener likes this winter squash very much that we always have this during our meal.  When they are cut, you can see the difference between sweet meat and buttercup in their color, size, and thickness of its meat. I bake the buttercup for 1 ½  hours, while the sweet meat for 3 ½ hours. Then I scrape the meat off, put them in my food processor,  and mix the processed squash  with honey.  Since they are so many, I measure out one cup of its meat and use cling wrap  to store them individually in the freezer.  When they are hard and frozen already, I store them in a food saver bag by using my Food Saver Machine.  When time comes for a meal, it is ready to be served on the table by just thawing it and reheating in the microwave.


PUMPKIN PLANT (wild)


PUMPKIN HARVESTS (wild)


SWEETY PIE PUMPKIN FIELD (garden)


SWEETY PIE PUMPKIN PLANT (garden)
As you can see in the picture, the pumpkin turns yellow to orange and the leaves and vines turn dry and crispy when it is ready for harvest. The stem leading from the pumpkin starts to harden and crack.  When harvesting, wear gloves because the stem can be very prickly.  Try to leave a stem of at least 4 inches on the pumpkin and don't carry it by the stem to avoid getting detached for the pumpking is really heavy.  There is a 10 day curing period for the pumpkins at 80 - 85 degrees F to prolong its storage life. Store them in dark areas with 50 to 60 degrees room temperature.  Do not place pumpkins on top of each other for they will rot.  These pumpkins can last even up to 6 months in storage.  They are an excellent sources of *Vitamins A, B6, C, and E, pantothenic acid, iron, magnesium, phosphorous, riboflavin, potassium, copper, and manganese.  It is also low in saturated fat, cholesterol, and sodium. Pumpkins are also member of the Cucurbitaceae family.


Please see Mom's Oven for recipes:
     Pumpkin Granola Cookies           


SWEETY PIE PUMPKIN HARVESTS (garden)


SQUASH AND PUMPKIN FIELDS (after the harvests)
This is  how the squash and pumpkin fields looks now after the harvests. Though there are still some remaining, all the plants have withered already. We were able to harvest 37 pumpkins excluding those that were eaten up by bugs and got rotten. We were able to gather more pumpkins than squash. I will be making more pumpkin breads, pumpkin cookies, pumpkin muffins, pumpkin pies, and what else?  Non-stop working in the kitchen? It’s worth doing it because we have lots of foods to store for our personal consumption.  It is an advantage because we don’t need to buy these foods from the grocery store.  Food prices go up due to gas price increase, but this is one of the best ways we can save money—to have our own garden.  We can even sell the excess harvests to any grocery store or farmers’ market to increase  our source of income.  What do you say?




4 comments :

  1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you very much for your nice comment. I really appreciate someone who also advocates about ways how to reduce waste and spoilage, especially on food. There are ways on how to store food bought from the grocery or harvested from the garden. Our brand is really Food Saver that really helps us minimize food waste. Thanks again for dropping by. Have a wonderful day.

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  2. Thanks for sharing this useful post Maymona. I loved to read this article very much. A serious info that most families can make towards environment, let alone their own financial institution reports is always to spend fewer meals. Cleaner sealers may get a considerable ways in assisting individuals spend and also spend fewer meals. check my blog

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    Replies
    1. Hi John,
      Thanks for stopping by and giving a nice comment. I will surely drop by your blog also. Have a great day.

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